Posts Tagged With: mm romance

Out Now – Native Tongue – M/M Erotic Romance by Lucy Felthouse (@cw1985) #erotica #romance #military #interracial

nativetongueBlurb:

They may be back on British soil, but the battle isn’t over.

When Captain Hugh Wilkes fell for his Afghan interpreter, Rustam Balkhi, he always knew things would never be easy. After months of complete secrecy, their return to England should have spelt an end to the sneaking around and the insane risks. But it seems there are many obstacles for them to overcome before they can truly be happy together. Can they get past those obstacles, or is this one battle too many for their fledgling relationship?

Author’s note: Although this story does work as a standalone tale, it’s recommended that you read the first instalment of the characters’ journey first—Desert Heat, which is available from all good retailers.

Buy links: http://lucyfelthouse.co.uk/published-works/native-tongue/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25462496-native-tongue

**For those of you that haven’t yet read Desert Heat either, there’s a great value double pack containing both books available exclusively on Amazon (from 14th May), which is available for lending, and for Kindle Unlimited members: http://lucyfelthouse.co.uk/published-works/desert-heat-native-tongue/ **

teaser_nativetongue

*****

Excerpt:

Captain Hugh Wilkes drummed enthusiastically on the steering wheel of his car as he drove it up the M3 towards London. He sung loudly and tunelessly along to the song on the radio, too, but it didn’t matter. No one could hear him.

He’d surprised himself by being so chilled out about the volume of Friday evening traffic. He wasn’t the most patient of people, so the slow progress should probably have been increasing his blood pressure, if not leading to full on road rage. But, although he’d have loved to be actually achieving the speed limit, not bumbling along at a mere fifty miles per hour, Wilkes was just glad the traffic was moving at all. Britain’s roads, the motorways in particular, soon came to a standstill if there was so much as a tiny bump between two vehicles. So any progress was better than none.

Besides, what could he do about it? His only other options to get to London from his base in Wiltshire were a train, or stealing a plane, helicopter or tank. The latter might just cause a little bit of bother, and mean the end of his army career, not to mention criminal charges. The former meant cramming in amongst sweaty, disgruntled commuters. If that wasn’t bad enough, he’d be charged an extortionate amount to do so, probably wouldn’t even get a seat, and would likely be subjected to delays.

At least driving took him from door to door, with plenty of personal space. And if there were delays, well, he could sit them out from the comfort of his own vehicle, with the climate control set to the perfect temperature, and the radio blasting some of his favourite tunes.

The next song was even better, and Wilkes’ tuneless wailing became more enthusiastic, as did the drumming on the steering wheel. He was in one hell of a good mood, and if he was truthful with himself, he knew it wasn’t just the fact the M3 was moving at a nice pace. It wasn’t the Friday feeling, either. Sure, both of those things were contributing to his happiness, but the main reason he was grinning like a buffoon was the thought of what awaited him in the capital. Or rather, who.

Rustam Balkhi. His gorgeous Afghan boyfriend, whom he’d met out in Afghanistan while they were working together for the British Army. Now, with their tour of duty over and the forces’ presence pulled out of the country, the two men had returned to England. Wilkes had gone back to his regular army life in Bulford Camp, near Salisbury. Balkhi was in London, where he’d recommenced the medical training he’d postponed to become an interpreter for the Brits.

The past few weeks had been somewhat of a whirlwind. Wilkes’ return to the UK had been straightforward, but Balkhi had had to jump through some hoops in order to get back onto his medical course. He’d been willing to start from scratch, but it’d seemed like an awful waste of time, so Wilkes had spoken to his superiors, who’d explained to the university what important work Balkhi had been doing. Fortunately, they’d been persuaded of Balkhi’s commitment and character, and allowed him to pick up where he’d left off. That settled, Balkhi had to pack up, travel back to the UK, find somewhere to live, move in… and all before the start of the next academic term.

Wilkes had felt terrible. His return had taken place a few weeks before Balkhi’s, so although he’d been granted some leave for R&R, he hadn’t been able to either spend it with Balkhi, or to use it help him with his relocation. By the time Balkhi had set foot on British soil, Wilkes was back to work. And, given nobody knew about the two of them, or even that Wilkes was gay, he couldn’t exactly ask for more leave in order to help his boyfriend move into his new flat.

Life had conspired against them ever since, so this was the first opportunity they’d had to see each other since saying goodbye in Afghanistan all those weeks ago. They’d communicated via email, text message and phone calls, but it just wasn’t the same. Especially since they’d gone from seeing each other every single day for the best part of six months to not setting eyes on each other for weeks on end.

Wilkes had struggled terribly in the interim. Life had been tough enough while they were still out in the desert. After weeks and weeks of trying desperately to ignore their growing attraction, they’d finally given in to it. It had been stupid and risky, but, having quickly realised there was more to their attraction than the physical, they’d decided to carry on their relationship in secret while they were in Afghanistan, see how it went, and figure things out once Wilkes’ tour of duty was over. Balkhi had always intended to return to the UK for his studies, so they would, at least, be living in the same country.

*****

Author Bio:

Lucy Felthouse is a very busy woman! She writes erotica and erotic romance in a variety of subgenres and pairings, and has over 100 publications to her name, with many more in the pipeline. These include several editions of Best Bondage Erotica, Best Women’s Erotica 2013 and Best Erotic Romance 2014. Another string to her bow is editing, and she has edited and co-edited a number of anthologies, and also edits for a small publishing house. She owns Erotica For All, is book editor for Cliterati, and is one eighth of The Brit Babes. Find out more at http://www.lucyfelthouse.co.uk. Join her on Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe to her newsletter at: http://eepurl.com/gMQb9

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Blurbtastic! by Lucy Felthouse (@cw1985)

This post originally appeared at the Erotica Readers & Writers Association blog.

Following on from my little rant about the dreaded sucknopsis, I thought I’d better do something more useful this time. And since, as you probably gathered if you read the previous post, synopses (??) are not my strong point, my natural progression was onto blurbs. Something I can do.

Yes, I am one of these rare writer-types that actually likes writing blurbs. Crazy, eh? I’ve even had folk pay me to write or re-write blurbs for them. I suspect my blurb writing skills come from the marketing side of my brain (my creative and marketing sides seem to live in a lovely harmony up in the old grey matter). When I graduated, I ended up in a PR & Marketing role and was immediately pointed in the direction of press releases, sales sheets and advertising copy, and told to “go create!”

Okay, those weren’t the exact words they used, but the bottom line is I was thrown in at the deep end. Fortunately, I discovered I did have an aptitude for writing copy that would entice consumers and retailers to buy products, and I think this is something I’ve continued to improve on over time. So now, when it comes to writing a blurb, I find it pretty easy. It does require a certain amount of distancing yourself from your work, though. It’s simple to think to yourself, oh well, this book is about X, Y and Z, if I just write that, people will get it, and buy the book.

But the thing to remember is that blurbs are meant to entice, to tempt, to intrigue. Not just tell people what the book is about (which is the difference between a synopsis and a blurb). You want to hint what the book is about (while giving enough information so that they know what the genre is, and if it’s their kind of read), but without giving away any major plot points or twists. Try and pick out the most important themes of your book and find a way to include them in the blurb. If possible, ask a question, as many people’s brains will be wired to want to know the answer to that question. And, of course, the way for them to get the answer… buy and read the book!

This may seem obvious, too, but mention your characters – or the main ones, anyway. Blurbs are fairly short and to the point, so you can’t give any great detail, but if you can present potential readers with enough information about your characters and your plot to let them know whether it sounds like a book they’d be interested in, with characters they’d like to read about, then you’re onto a winner.

Desert HeatHere’s one of my own blurbs as an example. This is from Desert Heat.

Their love is forbidden by rules, religion and risk. Yet still they can’t resist. [a lead in. Not necessary, but the publication the story was originally written for wanted a short, enticing strap line. This is what I came up with, and I liked it so much I kept it. It immediately tells you that it’s a love story, then goes on to indicate forbidden love, and risk. But then it teases – they can’t resist. So you know pretty much straight away that this is no straightforward love affair, and not a simple story.]

Captain Hugh Wilkes is on his last tour of duty in Afghanistan. [Now you know the name of the lead character, and that he’s military. You also have the setting of the story, not always necessary, but when it’s as interesting as a war zone, it’s probably worth a mention!] The British Army is withdrawing, and Wilkes expects his posting to be event-free [Now you know the character is a Brit, and that he’s expecting no drama on his tour.]. That is, until he meets his Afghan interpreter, Rustam Balkhi, who awakens desires in Wilkes that he’d almost forgotten about, and that won’t be ignored. [Now you know that the potential love interest is an Afghan national, which goes some way to explain the part about their love being forbidden by rules, religion and risk. The fact that the story is M/M is now fairly obvious from the names, but the cover has two men on it – so there should be no confusion there!]

And there you have it – hopefully my notes in brackets all made sense, and pulled out what I believe are important points for a blurb. Basically, keep it short and to the point, don’t give too much away, distance yourself from the story enough that you can see what will appeal to potential readers, and remember, you’re selling your story to someone, making them think “Ooh! That sounds interesting. Click.

If you can, get someone you know and trust to be honest with you to read the blurb. Even better if they haven’t read the story already – if they then want to read the story based on your blurb, then you know you’ve done a good job.

As with most things, writing blurbs takes practice. All publishers are different – some will literally take what you’ve written and use it, others will work with you to improve it, and others still will write something themselves. But the person that knows your story the best is you, so you’ve got the knowledge, the background, to know what will excite readers and pull them in. So it’s definitely worth spending time on your blurb, especially if it’ll be used word for word. You only have a short amount of time to make them want to click that buy button, so don’t waste the opportunity!

I hope you find this useful. Of course, things like this vary from person to person, but you may find this works for you.

Happy Blurbing!
Lucy

*****

Author Bio:

Lucy Felthouse is a very busy woman! She writes erotica and erotic romance in a variety of subgenres and pairings, and has over 100 publications to her name, with many more in the pipeline. These include several editions of Best Bondage Erotica, Best Women’s Erotica 2013 and Best Erotic Romance 2014. Another string to her bow is editing, and she has edited and co-edited a number of anthologies, and also edits for a small publishing house. She owns Erotica For All, is book editor for Cliterati, and is one eighth of The Brit Babes. Find out more at http://www.lucyfelthouse.co.uk. Join her on Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe to her newsletter at: http://eepurl.com/gMQb9

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A Brilliant Brit Bonanza by Lucy Felthouse (@cw1985)

Hi everyone,

As I mentioned in one of my previous posts, I’m part of the recently-released Brit Boys: On Boys M/M erotic romance boxed set. Myself and the other authors went on blog tour with the collection this month, and we all answered ten questions. I’ve compiled all the questions and my answers here so you can get all the details on my story in the collection – Love on Location. Here goes:

britboysonboys200What inspired your story?

It was nothing specific, really. The brief we’d agreed on for the collection was that it was to be oh-so-very British. I let my mind wander and it decided it wanted to do a story based in a rural location. The Peak District, in Derbyshire, is one of my very favourite places. I thought it’d be great to have an actor go and film on location and meet someone locally… things developed very quickly from there.

A lot of British authors set their books in the US, are your books normally set in the UK and does it make a difference to your style of writing?

The vast majority of my stories are based in the UK, purely because it’s the place I know best. Some of my much shorter works could, in theory, be based anywhere. But because I live in the UK and I’m British, I know I can write a more realistic story with realistic characters by using the Brit angle. I have written stories based elsewhere, including Paris, Rome, New York and California, to name but a few. The latter two in particular took a lot of research as I’ve never been to those places, and some of the characters involved were American. We may technically speak the same language, but there are so many nuances between British and American English that you just don’t realise until you’re trying to write it down!

Where are you from in the UK and does this influence your writing?

I’m from south Derbyshire, in England. Pretty much right in the middle of the country. In fact I’m just a few miles from the village which is officially the furthest from the sea in England. It doesn’t consciously influence my writing, I don’t think, because I write stories set all over the UK, depending on my inspiration. Some of my much shorter works could, in theory, be set anywhere. But I guess, because I don’t spend much time by the sea, that more of my stories are set inland. I have a particular fondness for stately homes and the British countryside, which I think is clear in my work, especially my novella in this collection!

What is it about British guys that non-Brits seem to love?

I think the accent is one, and I totally get that. I’m a sucker for certain British accents myself—I love a posh British accent (like Theo from Love on Location), also I also like northern English accents (like Eddie from Love on Location). I think maybe part of it is the country British guys come from, too—it’s got stunning countryside, a varied and amazing history, intriguing places, plenty of mystery… and who doesn’t love a guy with a bit of mystery? 😉

How is the process of writing a short story different to writing a full length novel?

I started out in short stories, and it took me a long time to progress because I was frightened. Frightened of getting it wrong, of not being able to finish it, of not being able to think of a storyline big enough to develop into a full length novel. I took a baby step and wrote a novella first, and that was only because one of my publishers asked me and I didn’t want to say no. When I agreed I immediately panicked. But I sat down and figured it out, wrote a plan and eventually achieved my goal. From there I wrote a few more novellas. Having proved to myself I could do it, I decided it was then time to bite the bullet and write a full length novel. It took lots of research and lots of planning, but I found once I’d started, it became quite addictive, especially when the word count started racking up.

For me, a short story is something I can just sit down and write and see what happens. Whereas a novel needs serious thought to make sure there really is enough there to sustain the word count, keep it interesting and also satisfying for the reader.

What British tradition do you think the rest of the world should know about?

I think everyone knows about the best one, don’t they? Drinking lots of tea!

I know we have tons of traditions and some of them are very specific to certain areas. Some of them don’t even make sense to other Brits—like rolling cheese down hills and morris dancing. I love our quirks and eccentricities—and that’s why I love the premise of this book. It’s thoroughly British and will hopefully teach the world some more British slang!

When writing a book set in the UK, do you use slang or do you tend to stick to the more well known words to describe things?

I don’t deliberately use slang. I tend to write the way I speak, so yes, my writing is probably packed full of slang, even more than I realise, no doubt. To me, this is much more authentic—this is the way Brits speak and think, so I’m always really reluctant to change out slang words and phrases if I think a reader won’t get it. I do an awful lot of reading myself, and if I read a word or phrase from a non-Brit author’s work that I don’t understand, if I can’t work it out from the context, I’ll just Google it. I’d much rather learn the word so I know what it means for future reference—and I’d never complain. This is the author’s way of writing, and why should they change it just in case?

What famous Brit past or present would you like to spend a day with and why?

At the moment, it would have to be Benedict Cumberbatch. He’s my current favourite obsession—hence the fact the main character in Love on Location, Theo Samuels, looks incredibly like him. Benedict keeps invading my dreams, and we keep going off and solving crimes together (no, this is not a joke), so I’d like to meet him and ask him why he’s visiting me in slumber. And then I’d snog his face off. He’s on my “allowed” list so my other half wouldn’t mind. As for his other half… well, she’d have to catch me, first 😉

Whats the one place you would recommend to people coming to visit the UK?

Wow, just one? I’m really not sure I could choose just a single place. There are so many incredible places to go—and I haven’t even managed to visit them all myself, yet! I think I’m going to cheat and suggest the Peak District—it’s a huge area to cover, but there are so many amazing sights within the area that lovers of the countryside won’t want to miss out.

How is writing m/m fiction different to writing m/f?

It’s not hugely different, I don’t think. People fall in love just the same, regardless of genre. The things to keep in mind, though, are that men and women speak differently, so I have to remain conscious of that all the time, and I often get feedback from beta readers to “man up” my speech a bit. Also, when it’s m/f, you can just say he and she, and not have to mention names all the time. But to keep saying he did this, he did that, you have to really make sure it’s clear to the reader who’s doing what—especially when it comes to sex scenes! But it’s worth it… two guys together is hot! 😉

 

I hope you enjoyed learning more about me, the novella and the collection. If you want to check it out, be sure and buy your copy by the end of January – the special introductory price of $0.99/99p ends on the 31st! And tell your friends 😉

Grab your copy here: http://lucyfelthouse.co.uk/published-works/brit-boys-on-boys/

BB #1

*****

Author Bio:

Lucy Felthouse is a very busy woman! She writes erotica and erotic romance in a variety of subgenres and pairings, and has over 100 publications to her name, with many more in the pipeline. These include several editions of Best Bondage Erotica, Best Women’s Erotica 2013 and Best Erotic Romance 2014. Another string to her bow is editing, and she has edited and co-edited a number of anthologies, and also edits for a small publishing house. She owns Erotica For All, is book editor for Cliterati, and is one eighth of The Brit Babes. Find out more at http://www.lucyfelthouse.co.uk. Join her on Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe to her newsletter at: http://eepurl.com/gMQb9

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Coming Soon – Brit Boys: On Boys

bb-box_jpeg - CopyDue for release on 30th December, Brit Boys: On Boys, a collection of 8 M/M novellas written by 8 top British M/M authors. This smokin’ hot box set is initially available at the bargain price of 99c/99p, that’s a steal for 147,000 words/440 pages of unforgettable M/M erotic romance that will leave your eReader, and you, burning up.

 

Brit Boys: On Boys

From east to west and north to south, these British boys are having a blast in and out of the bedroom with the men of their dreams. They’re topping and bottoming from London to Cardiff, living out fantasies in the wildest fells and hooking up while serving HRH Queen Elizabeth II.

With passion and lust the name of the game, nothing is off limits. Throw in honed muscles, high-strength testosterone and an accent to die for and there is nothing they can’t do and no one they can’t get in this world or another.

 

Bodywork

By Ashe Barker

Alex is doing okay. His body repair shop makes enough to live on, he has a decent apartment, life is fine. That all changes when he runs into Graham in a supermarket car park – literally. He offers to fix the damage to Graham’s car free of charge. The sparks soon fly, and the heat between them has nothing to do with welding equipment.

 

Breaking the Marine

By M.K. Elliott

Brandon Rosen hadn’t planned for his final night before enrolling in the Royal Marines to involve a hot stranger and a pub car park. And he certainly hadn’t planned for that same hot stranger to turn up at the barracks in the form of his Drill Instructor, Corporal Will Stewart. In the testosterone fuelled environment of the training camp, can Brandon and Will overcome past pains and face up to what they really want? Or will the Royal Marine Commando School break their relationship before it even gets started?

 

Love on Location

By Lucy Felthouse

When Theo Samuels heads off to film on location in the village of Stoneydale, he’s expecting drama to take place on camera, not off. But when he meets gorgeous local lad, Eddie Henderson, he struggles to ignore his attraction. A relationship between the two of them would be utterly impractical, yet they’re drawn together nonetheless. Can they overcome the seemingly endless hurdles between them? Or is their fling destined to remain as just that?

 

Landscapes

By K D Grace

Alonso Darlington has a disturbing method of keeping landscaper, Reese Chambers, both safe from and oblivious to his dangerous lust for the man. But Reese isn’t easy to keep secrets from, and Alonso wants way more than to admire the man from afar. Can he risk a real relationship without risking Reese’s life?

 

The Chase

By Lily Harlem

Steve’s killing time working in a comedy club. Why not? It makes him laugh and both the clientele and the comedians are not just fit but also great company. One stand up joker decides to create a wild goose chase for Steve and his ex Robert. Cavorting around Cardiff on a frosty night, however, does more than just show them the way to a threesome, it also reveals the reasons why they should give each other one more shot.

 

Dish of the Day

By Clare London

Richie’s sunk all his hopes and savings into a new restaurant in south London promoting British ingredients and recipes. His best friends Craig and Ben should be around to help him celebrate the grand opening, but it looks like it’s all heading for disaster – until his friends step in to tell him some home truths. Then they’ll help him relax and enjoy their loving, intimate menu instead.

 

E2

By Sarah Masters

When Archie meets Dan after The Change, he realises there is no such thing as a random meeting of soul mates, it’s all mapped out in the stars. Now all he’s got to do is hope those orbiting planets stay in alignment and true love finds him again.

 

Locked Out

By Josephine Myles

Getting accidentally locked out of his hotel room on Valentine’s Day night is embarrassing enough for teacher Martin Cooper, but the fact he’s stark naked makes it even worse. It doesn’t help that the one person he runs into is Rod, the gorgeous man he’d been checking out earlier in the hotel pool. But when Rod offers Martin a refuge, the night heats up. Now if only Martin could get the hang of this seduction business…

Find out more and pre-order your copy at Brit Boys: On Boys.

 

Awesome British M/M Authors
Ashe Barker
M.K. Elliott
Lucy Felthouse
K D Grace
Lily Harlem
Clare London
Sarah Masters
Josephine Myles

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